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Die beiden Agenten James West und der Marshal Artemus Gordon könnten unterschiedlicher nicht sein. Doch gemeinsam müssen sie dem US-Präsidenten helfen, das Verschwinden von mehreren Top-Wissenschaftlern aufzuklären. Sie stoßen auf den. Wild Wild West ist eine US-amerikanische Steampunk-Western-Action-Komödie, die unter der Regie von Barry Sonnenfeld entstand. Der Film startete am. Wild Wild West steht für: Originaltitel von Verrückter wilder Westen, US-​amerikanische Fernsehserie (–); Wild Wild West (Film), US-​amerikanischer. Wild Wild West. ()IMDb h 41minX-Ray. US Marshall, Jim West, and inventor Artemus Gordon have been teamed up by President Ulysses S. Grant. Buy Wild wild west from Amazon's Movies Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.

Willd Wild West

Buy Wild wild west from Amazon's Movies Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Wild Wild West ein Film von Barry Sonnenfeld mit Will Smith, Kevin Kline. Inhaltsangabe: Die Vereinigten Staaten im Wilden Westen von Die beiden​. Wild Wild West. 46 Bewertungen. Veröffentlicht 1 Jan. Warner Bros. Wähle eine Version aus. Der Wunschliste hinzufügen. Beschreibung. Amerika, kurz. Retrieved April 11, Pioneers generally attempted to complete the journey during a single warm season, usually for six months. Gordon helps West literally bring down the curtain on Crotty. The Battle of Glorieta Pass soon erupted, and the Union ended the Confederate campaign and the area west of Texas remained in Union hands. Casino Mossingen Publishing. Denne Bart Petitclerc. Serial Killers. Because of health problems, however, Dunn only appeared in 10 episodes instead of

Willd Wild West Video

Wild Wild West - Nostalgia Critic Besetzung und Team. Einen halbwegs durchwaschener Spass, der bald ins lächerliche führt. Will Smith James West. Das man James Bond Anleihen in einen wilden Westen wirft, ist ja unterhaltsam. Der Film startete am Sprachen Englisch. Arliss Loveless Kenneth Branagh. Doch manche Streifen altern bekanntlich schlechter als andere - so auch hier. All diese 3d Adventure Games bereuen einen ihrer Filme zutiefst. Musetta Vander Munitia. Emmet Walsh Coleman. Kenneth Branagh. Als VoD. Tonformat. Kenneth Branagh Dr.

Willd Wild West Video

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American Knife , Elisha Cook Jr. Guest stars: Sam Wanamaker Dr. Guest stars: Ron Randell Col. Meyer , S. Chayne , Nelson Olmsted Dr.

Guest stars: Theodore Marcuse Dr. The second season of The Wild Wild West continued the basic format of first season, but also made some changes.

The most notable of these was that the series was now shot in color, which enhanced the Victorian ambiance of the s setting.

As in the first season, Dr. Loveless was featured in four episodes. Meanwhile, an attempt was made to establish another recurring villain with the character of Count Manzeppi played by Victor Buono , who had appeared in the pilot episode.

However, the Count was dropped after only two episodes. Again, as in the first season, 28 episodes were produced for the season.

Initially, Michael Garrison continued in the dual capacity as producer and executive producer. However, after seven episodes, the producing chores were handed to Bruce Lansbury, the younger brother of actress Angela Lansbury , and Garrison returned to working solely as the series' executive producer.

Garrison died on August 17, , when he fell down a flight of stairs at his home in Bel Air. The breakdown between the two producers, as broadcast, is: [21].

However, the series continued to be listed as "A Michael Garrison Production in association with the CBS Television Network" in the end credits for the rest of the run.

The Wild Wild West slipped in the ratings during the second season and failed to be among the 25 most popular shows during the — season.

Guest stars: Boris Karloff Mr. Guest stars: Ida Lupino Dr. Guest stars: Sammy Davis Jr. Wynant Pinto. Guest stars: John Ashley Lt.

White Robber , Howard Wright Professor. Guest stars: Harry Townes Dr. Lambert , Whitey Hughes Giggling Henchman. Radilac Priest , Jonathan Lippe Capt.

Adam Dushan , Michael Shillo Dr. Butcher , Jack Rigney Mr. The third season of The Wild Wild West saw a shift away from fantasy and more toward traditional western with the "villains becoming more political and less outrageous.

Loveless in only one episode during this season "The Night Dr. Loveless Died". On January 24, , when The Wild Wild West was near the end of shooting for the season, star Robert Conrad , who did the majority of his own stunt work, was seriously injured when he fell from a chandelier during the filming of the episode "The Night of the Fugitives".

Production was shut down for the season and the "Fugitives" was completed and broadcast during the fourth season.

All of the episodes of this season were produced by Bruce Lansbury. Due to Conrad's injury only 24 episodes were made for this season. As in the second season, The Wild Wild West did not rank among the 25 most popular shows during the — season.

Guest stars: Robert Duvall Dr. Guest stars: Oscar Beregi Jr. Wilke Gen. Guest stars: Hurd Hatfield Dr. Von Liebig , George D.

Barrows Johann. Pat O'Malley Brother Angelo. Due to his injury near the end of filming of the previous season, the fourth season of The Wild Wild West forced Robert Conrad to use a double for any stunt that the studio considered "chancy.

As a result, the script for the next episode filmed, "The Night of the Juggernaut", was re-written to have Martin's character, Artemus Gordon, receive a leg injury.

Nine episodes were filmed without Martin although he continued to have co-star billing in the opening credits.

The absence of his character was explained as being on "special assignment" in Washington, D. Ross Martin returned to filming for the final three episodes of the season, which also turned out to be the last episodes of the entire series.

The Wild Wild West was cancelled after four seasons, possibly due to declining ratings it again did not place among the top 25 [12] , but also possibly due to a crack-down on programs with excessive violence.

During this season, Ross Martin received an Emmy Award nomination for leading actor in a drama series. All of the fourth-season episodes were produced by Bruce Lansbury.

Huff 4th Guard. Guest stars: Robert Ellenstein Dr. Dave Bartlett. Vitanza Grady. Huff Pete , Ken Mayer Hannon. Lillian Lehman and Roy Engel only appear in the part 1 recap that replaces the usual pre-credits teaser.

Guest stars: Alan Hale Jr. This film proved to be one of CBS' highest rated specials of the year, [31] thus warranting a second reunion film, More Wild Wild West.

The second film, however, proved less successful. These two reunion movies were produced by Robert Jacks and directed by Burt Kennedy and are notably more comical than the original series.

Guest star: Paul Williams Dr. Miguelito Loveless Jr. Guest star: Victor Buono Dr. However, only the latter contains the reunion films.

The Wild Wild West had six different producers during the course of its four-season run, plus a seventh for the two reunion movies.

A breakdown of the episodes and their producers appears in the chart below. Moore directing the most episodes 25 total.

Of note is that three episodes were directed by William Witney , who had co-directed many " cliffhangers " during the s and s , including Zorro Rides Again , The Lone Ranger and The Adventures of Captain Marvel.

During its run, The Wild Wild West featured a large number of notable guest stars. Many of these guests also appeared on Star Trek. These actors and the titles to the episodes of both series that they appeared in are listed below.

Some guest stars who only appeared on Star Trek were:. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Wikipedia list article.

Downey, California: Arnett Press. Retrieved Inside The Wild Wild West. Cypress, California : Cangey Publishing Co. Days of Thrills and Adventure.

New York: Collier Books. Archived from the original on Categories : Lists of American fantasy television series episodes Lists of American science fiction television series episodes Lists of American Western television series episodes.

Hidden categories: Articles with short description Short description is different from Wikidata Episode lists with unformatted story or teleplay credits.

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Richard C. Gilbert Ralston. This episode the series' pilot is formatted differently from all the other episodes of the series. It is the only episode that features the opening credits before the teaser, the only first season episode that features the commercial art break in a cartoon fashion the remainder of the first season episodes featured them as a textured photograph , and the only episode to place a commercial art break in the bottom center picture.

This is also the only episode to feature James Gregory as President Grant. William Witney. George V. Schenck and William Marks.

Villain: Flory. Bernard L. Miguelito Loveless, along with the doctor's two assistants, the lovely Antoinette and the mute and simple-minded giant, Voltaire.

Loveless is planning to take over California from control of Governor Newton Booth , which the doctor claims rightfully belongs to him through his mother's venerable Ranchero family line.

Villain: Miguelito Loveless. Oliver Crawford. Villain: Warren Trevor. Don Taylor. Villain:John Avery. The trail leads to the leader of the gang: Captain Ansel Coffin, a blind man seeking revenge.

A hundred rural Mormon settlements sprang up in what Young called " Deseret ", which he ruled as a theocracy.

It later became Utah Territory. Young's Salt Lake City settlement served as the hub of their network, which reached into neighboring territories as well.

The communalism and advanced farming practices of the Mormons enabled them to succeed. The great threat to the Mormons in Utah was the U.

The Republican Party swore to destroy polygamy, which it saw as an affront to religious, cultural, and moral values of modern civilization. Confrontations verged on open warfare in the late s as President Buchanan sent in troops.

Although there were no military battles fought, and negotiations led to a stand down, violence still escalated and there were several casualties.

Finally, in , the Church leadership announced polygamy was no longer a central tenet, and a compromise was reached, with Utah becoming a state and the Mormons dividing into Republicans and Democrats.

The federal government provided subsidies for the development of mail and freight delivery, and by , Congress authorized road improvements and an overland mail service to California.

The new commercial wagon trains service primarily hauled freight. In John Butterfield —69 established a stage service that went from Saint Louis to San Francisco in 24 days along a southern route.

William Russell, hoping to get a government contract for more rapid mail delivery service, started the Pony Express in , cutting delivery time to ten days.

In Congress passed the Land-Grant Telegraph Act which financed the construction of Western Union's transcontinental telegraph lines.

Hiram Sibley , Western Union's head, negotiated exclusive agreements with railroads to run telegraph lines along their right-of-way.

Eight years before the transcontinental railroad opened, the First Transcontinental Telegraph linked Omaha, Nebraska, to San Francisco on October 24, Constitutionally, Congress could not deal with slavery in the states but it did have jurisdiction in the western territories.

California unanimously rejected slavery in and became a free state. New Mexico allowed slavery, but it was rarely seen there.

Kansas was off-limits to slavery by the Compromise of Free Soil elements feared that if slavery were allowed rich planters would buy up the best lands and work them with gangs of slaves, leaving little opportunity for free white men to own farms.

Few Southern planters were interested in Kansas, but the idea that slavery was illegal there implied they had a second-class status that was intolerable to their sense of honor, and seemed to violate the principle of state's rights.

With the passage of the extremely controversial Kansas—Nebraska Act in , Congress left the decision up to the voters on the ground in Kansas.

Across the North, a new major party was formed to fight slavery: the Republican Party , with numerous westerners in leadership positions, most notably Abraham Lincoln of Illinois.

To influence the territorial decision, anti-slavery elements also called "Jayhawkers" or "Free-soilers" financed the migration of politically determined settlers.

But pro-slavery advocates fought back with pro-slavery settlers from Missouri. The antislavery forces took over by , as Kansas became a free state.

The episode demonstrated that a democratic compromise between North and South over slavery was impossible and served to hasten the Civil War.

Despite its large territory, the trans-Mississippi West had a small population and its wartime story has to a large extent been underplayed in the historiography of the American Civil War.

The Confederacy engaged in several important campaigns in the West. However, Kansas, a major area of conflict building up to the war, was the scene of only one battle, at Mine Creek.

But its proximity to Confederate lines enabled pro-Confederate guerrillas, such as Quantrill's Raiders , to attack Union strongholds and massacre the residents.

In Texas, citizens voted to join the Confederacy; anti-war Germans were hanged. Confederate Arizona was created by Arizona citizens who wanted protection against Apache raids after the United States Army units were moved out.

The Confederacy then sets its sight to gain control of the New Mexico Territory. General Henry Hopkins Sibley was tasked for the campaign, and together with his New Mexico Army , marched right up the Rio Grande in an attempt to take the mineral wealth of Colorado as well as California.

The First Regiment of Volunteers discovered the rebels, and they immediately warned and joined the Yankees at Fort Union.

The Battle of Glorieta Pass soon erupted, and the Union ended the Confederate campaign and the area west of Texas remained in Union hands.

Missouri , a Union state where slavery was legal, became a battleground when the pro-secession governor, against the vote of the legislature, led troops to the federal arsenal at St.

Louis ; he was aided by Confederate forces from Arkansas and Louisiana. Louis and all of Missouri for the Union. The state was the scene of numerous raids and guerrilla warfare in the west.

Army after established a series of military posts across the frontier, designed to stop warfare among Indian tribes or between Indians and settlers.

Throughout the 19th century, Army officers typically served built their careers in peacekeeper roles moving from fort to fort until retirement. Actual combat experience was uncommon for any one soldier.

The most dramatic conflict was the Sioux war in Minnesota in when Dakota tribes systematically attacked German farms to drive out the settlers.

The state militia fought back and Lincoln sent in federal troops. The federal government tried Indians for murder, and were convicted and sentenced to death.

Lincoln pardoned the majority, but 38 leaders were hanged. The decreased presence of Union troops in the West left behind untrained militias; hostile tribes used the opportunity to attack settlers.

The militia struck back hard, most notably by attacking the winter quarters of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, filled with women and children, at the Sand Creek massacre in eastern Colorado in late Kit Carson and the U.

Army in trapped the entire Navajo tribe in New Mexico, where they had been raiding settlers and put them on a reservation.

The result by was millions of new farms in the Plains states, many operated by new immigrants from Germany and Scandinavia.

With the war over and slavery abolished, the federal government focused on improving the governance of the territories.

It subdivided several territories, preparing them for statehood, following the precedents set by the Northwest Ordinance of It standardized procedures and the supervision of territorial governments, taking away some local powers, and imposing much "red tape", growing the federal bureaucracy significantly.

Federal involvement in the territories was considerable. In addition to direct subsidies, the federal government maintained military posts, provided safety from Indian attacks, bankrolled treaty obligations, conducted surveys and land sales, built roads, staffed land offices, made harbor improvements, and subsidized overland mail delivery.

Territorial citizens came to both decry federal power and local corruption, and at the same time, lament that more federal dollars were not sent their way.

Territorial governors were political appointees and beholden to Washington so they usually governed with a light hand, allowing the legislatures to deal with the local issues.

In addition to his role as civil governor, a territorial governor was also a militia commander, a local superintendent of Indian affairs, and the state liaison with federal agencies.

The legislatures, on the other hand, spoke for the local citizens and they were given considerable leeway by the federal government to make local law.

These improvements to governance still left plenty of room for profiteering. As Mark Twain wrote while working for his brother, the secretary of Nevada, "The government of my country snubs honest simplicity but fondles artistic villainy, and I think I might have developed into a very capable pickpocket if I had remained in the public service a year or two.

In acquiring, preparing, and distributing public land to private ownership, the federal government generally followed the system set forth by the Land Ordinance of Federal exploration and scientific teams would undertake reconnaissance of the land and determine Native American habitation.

Through treaties, the land titles would be ceded by the resident tribes. Townships would be formed from the lots and sold at public auction.

As part of public policy, the government would award public land to certain groups such as veterans, through the use of "land script".

As a counter to land speculators, farmers formed "claims clubs" to enable them to buy larger tracts than the acre 0.

In , Congress passed three important bills that transformed the land system. The Homestead Act granted acres 0. The only cost was a modest filing fee.

The law was especially important in the settling of the Plains states. Many took a free homestead and others purchased their land from railroads at low rates.

The Pacific Railroad Act of provided for the land needed to build the transcontinental railroad. The land was given the railroads alternated with government-owned tracts saved for free distribution to homesteaders.

Railroads had up to five years to sell or mortgage their land, after tracks were laid, after which unsold land could be purchased by anyone.

Often railroads sold some of their government acquired land to homesteaders immediately to encourage settlement and the growth of markets the railroads would then be able to serve.

Nebraska railroads in the s were strong boosters of lands along their routes. They sent agents to Germany and Scandinavia with package deals that included cheap transportation for the family as well as its furniture and farm tools, and they offered long-term credit at low rates.

Boosterism succeeded in attracting adventurous American and European families to Nebraska , helping them purchase land grant parcels on good terms.

The selling price depended on such factors as soil quality, water, and distance from the railroad. The Morrill Act of provided land grants to states to begin colleges of agriculture and mechanical arts engineering.

Black colleges became eligible for these land grants in The Act succeeded in its goals to open new universities and make farming more scientific and profitable.

In the s government-sponsored surveys to chart the remaining unexplored regions of the West, and to plan possible routes for a transcontinental railroad.

Regionalism animated debates in Congress regarding the choice of a northern, central, or southern route. Engineering requirements for the rail route were an adequate supply of water and wood, and as nearly-level route as possible, given the weak locomotives of the era.

In the s, proposals to build a transcontinental failed because of Congressional disputes over slavery. With the secession of the Confederate states in , the modernizers in the Republican party took over Congress and wanted a line to link to California.

Private companies were to build and operate the line. Construction would be done by unskilled laborers who would live in temporary camps along the way.

Immigrants from China and Ireland did most of the construction work. Theodore Judah , the chief engineer of the Central Pacific surveyed the route from San Francisco east.

Judah's tireless lobbying efforts in Washington were largely responsible for the passage of the Pacific Railroad Act , which authorized construction of both the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific which built west from Omaha.

The line was completed in May Coast-to-coast passenger travel in 8 days now replaced wagon trains or sea voyages that took 6 to 10 months and cost much more.

The road was built with mortgages from New York, Boston, and London, backed by land grants. There were no federal cash subsidies, But there was a loan to the Central Pacific that was eventually repaid at six percent interest.

The federal government offered land-grants in a checkerboard pattern. The railroad sold every-other square, with the government opening its half to homesteaders.

Local and state governments also aided the financing. Most of the manual laborers on the Central Pacific were new arrivals from China.

He concludes that senior officials quickly realized the high degree of cleanliness and reliability of the Chinese. Ong explores whether or not the Chinese Railroad Workers were exploited by the railroad, with whites in better positions.

He finds the railroad set different wage rates for whites and Chinese and used the latter in the more menial and dangerous jobs, such as the handling and the pouring of nitroglycerin.

Building the railroad required six main activities: surveying the route, blasting a right of way, building tunnels and bridges, clearing and laying the roadbed, laying the ties and rails, and maintaining and supplying the crews with food and tools.

The work was highly physical, using horse-drawn plows and scrapers, and manual picks, axes, sledgehammers, and handcarts.

A few steam-driven machines, such as shovels, were used. For blasting, they used black powder. Six transcontinental railroads were built in the Gilded Age plus two in Canada ; they opened up the West to farmers and ranchers.

All but the Great Northern of James J. Hill relied on land grants. The financial stories were often complex. For example, the Northern Pacific received its major land grant in Financier Jay Cooke — was in charge until when he went bankrupt.

Federal courts, however, kept bankrupt railroads in operation. In Henry Villard — took over and finally completed the line to Seattle. But the line went bankrupt in the Panic of and Hill took it over.

He then merged several lines with financing from J. Morgan , but President Theodore Roosevelt broke them up in In the first year of operation, —70, , passengers made the long trip.

Settlers were encouraged with promotions to come West on free scouting trips to buy railroad land on easy terms spread over several years.

The railroads had "Immigration Bureaus" which advertised package low-cost deals including passage and land on easy terms for farmers in Germany and Scandinavia.

The prairies, they were promised, did not mean backbreaking toil because "settling on the prairie which is ready for the plow is different from plunging into a region covered with timber".

All manufacturers benefited from the lower costs of transportation and the much larger radius of business.

White concludes with a mixed verdict. The transcontinental did open up the West to settlement, brought in many thousands of high-tech, highly paid workers and managers, created thousands of towns and cities, oriented the nation onto an east-west axis, and proved highly valuable for the nation as a whole.

On the other hand, too many were built, and they were built too far ahead of actual demand. The result was a bubble that left heavy losses to investors and led to poor management practices.

By contrast, as White notes, the lines in the Midwest and East supported by a very large population base, fostered farming, industry, and mining while generating steady profits and receiving few government benefits.

The new railroads provided the opportunity for migrants to go out and take a look, with special family tickets, the cost of which could be applied to land purchases offered by the railroads.

Farming the plains was indeed more difficult than back east. Water management was more critical, lightning fires were more prevalent, the weather was more extreme, rainfall was less predictable.

The fearful stayed home. The actual migrants looked beyond fears of the unknown. Their chief motivation to move west was to find a better economic life than the one they had.

Farmers sought larger, cheaper, and more fertile land; merchants and tradesmen sought new customers and new leadership opportunities. Laborers wanted higher paying work and better conditions.

As settlers move West, they have to face challenges along the way, such as the lack of wood for housing, bad weather like blizzards and droughts, and fearsome tornadoes.

One of the greatest plagues that hit the homesteaders was the Locust Plague which devastated the Great Plains. On April 22, over , settlers and cattlemen known as "boomers" [] lined up at the border, and when the army's guns and bugles giving the signal, began a mad dash to stake their claims in the Land Run of A witness wrote, "The horsemen had the best of it from the start.

It was a fine race for a few minutes, but soon the riders began to spread out like a fan, and by the time they reached the horizon they were scattered about as far as the eye could see".

In the same manner, millions of acres of additional land were opened up and settled in the following four years. Fearful of a takeover of Alaska then Russian America from the British Army based in British North America and due to lack of economic interests, Russia was eager to get rid of the territory it held onto since Secretary of State William Seward negotiated with the Russians to acquire the tremendous landmass of Alaska, an area roughly one-fifth the size of the rest of the United States.

On March 30, , the U. The transfer ceremony was completed in Sitka on October 18, , as Russian soldiers handed over the territory to the United States Army.

Critics at the time decried the purchase as "Seward's Folly", reasoning that there were no natural resources in the new territory and no one can be bothered to live in such a cold, icy climate.

Although the development and settlement of Alaska grew slowly, the discovery of goldfields during the Klondike Gold Rush in , Nome Gold Rush in , and Fairbanks Gold Rush in brought thousands of miners into the territory, thus propelling Alaska's prosperity for decades to come.

Major oil discoveries in the late 20th century made the state rich. That same day, the coup organizers created the Provisional Government of Hawaii and appointed Hawaiian jurist Sanford Ballard Dole as the islands' first President, hoping that Hawaii would be annexed by the United States.

Within 48 hours after the overthrow, the new Hawaiian government was recognized by all nations with diplomatic ties to the Kingdom of Hawaii, including the U.

Cleveland was unwilling to overthrow the government by force, and his successor, William McKinley , negotiated a treaty with the Republic of Hawaii in In April , the Spanish—American War broke out, and the strategic use of a naval base at Pearl Harbor in the Pacific during the war convinced the U.

It was signed into law by President McKinley three days later and came into effect on August 12, , officially creating the Territory of Hawaii.

Indian wars have occurred throughout the United States though the conflicts are generally separated into two categories; the Indian wars east of the Mississippi River and the Indian wars west of the Mississippi.

Bureau of the Census provided an estimate of deaths:. The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number.

They have cost the lives of about 19, white men, women and children, including those killed in individual combats, and the lives of about 30, Indians.

The actual number of killed and wounded Indians must be very much higher than the given Fifty percent additional would be a safe estimate Historian Russell Thornton estimates that from to , the Indian population declined from , to as few as , The depopulation was principally caused by disease as well as warfare.

Many tribes in Texas, such as the Karankawan , Akokisa , Bidui and others, were extinguished due to conflicts with settlers. Government, and the Doolittle Committee was formed to investigate the causes as well as provide recommendations for preserving the population.

The expansion of migration into the Southeastern United States in the s to the s forced the federal government to deal with the "Indian question".

The Indians were under federal control but were independent of state governments. State legislatures and state judges had no authority on their lands, and the states demanded control.

Politically the new Democratic Party of President Andrew Jackson demanded the removal of the Indians out of the southeastern states to new lands in the west, while the Whig Party and the Protestant churches were opposed to removal.

The Jacksonian Democracy proved irresistible, as it won the presidential elections of , , and By the "Indian Removal policy" began, to implement the act of Congress signed by Andrew Jackson in Many historians have sharply attacked Jackson.

To motivate Natives reluctant to move, the federal government also promised rifles, blankets, tobacco, and cash. By the Cherokee, the last Indian nation in the South, had signed the removal treaty and relocated to Oklahoma.

All the tribes were given new land in the " Indian Territory " which later became Oklahoma. Of the approximate 70, Indians removed, about 18, died from disease, starvation, and exposure on the route.

The impact of the removals was severe. The transplanted tribes had considerable difficulty adapting to their new surroundings and sometimes clashed with the tribes native to the area.

The only way for an Indian to remain and avoid removal was to accept the federal offer of acres 2. However, many Natives who took the offer were defrauded by "ravenous speculators" who stole their claims and sold their land to whites.

Of the five tribes, the Seminole offered the most resistance, hiding out in the Florida swamps and waging a war which cost the U.

Indian warriors in the West, using their traditional style of limited, battle-oriented warfare, confronted the U.

The Indians emphasized bravery in combat while the Army put its emphasis not so much on individual combat as on building networks of forts, developing a logistics system, and using the telegraph and railroads to coordinate and concentrate its forces.

Plains Indian intertribal warfare bore no resemblance to the "modern" warfare practiced by the Americans along European lines, using its vast advantages in population and resources.

Many tribes avoided warfare and others supported the U. The tribes hostile to the government continued to pursue their traditional brand of fighting and, therefore, were unable to have any permanent success against the Army.

Indian wars were fought throughout the western regions, with more conflicts in the states bordering Mexico than in the interior states.

Arizona ranked highest, with known battles fought within the state's boundaries between Americans and the Natives. Arizona ranked highest in war deaths, with 4, killed, including soldiers, civilians, and Native Americans.

That was more than twice as many as occurred in Texas, the second-highest-ranking state. Most of the deaths in Arizona were caused by the Apache. Michno also says that fifty-one percent of the Indian war battles between and took place in Arizona, Texas, and New Mexico, as well as thirty-seven percent of the casualties in the county west of the Mississippi River.

Indians included in this group attacked and harassed emigrant parties and miners crossing the Snake River Valley, which resulted in further retaliation of the white settlements and the intervention of the United States army.

The war resulted in a total of 1, men who have been killed, wounded, and captured from both sides. Unlike other Indian Wars, the Snake War has widely forgotten in United States history due to having only limited coverage of the war.

The conflict was fought in — while the American Civil War was still ongoing. Caused by dissolution between the Natives and the white settlers in the region, the war was infamous for the atrocities done between the two parties.

White militias destroyed Native villages and killed Indian women and children such as the bloody Sand Creek massacre , and the Indians also raided ranches, farms and killed white families such as the American Ranch massacre and Raid on Godfrey Ranch.

In —, Carson used a scorched earth policy in the Navajo Campaign , burning Navajo fields and homes, and capturing or killing their livestock.

He was aided by other Indian tribes with long-standing enmity toward the Navajos, chiefly the Utes. The Apaches under his command conducted ambushes on US cavalries and forts, such as their attack on Cibecue Creek , while also raiding upon prominent farms and ranches, such as their infamous attack on the Empire Ranch that killed three cowboys.

During the Comanche Campaign , the Red River War was fought in —75 in response to the Comanche's dwindling food supply of buffalo, as well as the refusal of a few bands to be inducted in reservations.

The war finally ended with a final confrontation between the Comanches and the U. Cavalry in Palo Duro Canyon. The last Comanche war chief, Quanah Parker , surrendered in June , which would finally end the wars fought by Texans and Indians.

It was the most successful campaign against the U. By the Treaty of Fort Laramie , the U. With 53 Modoc warriors, Captain Jack held off 1, men of the U.

Army for 7 months. Captain Jack killed Edward Canby. Numbering only warriors, the Nez Perce "battled some 2, American regulars and volunteers of different military units, together with their Indian auxiliaries of many tribes, in a total of eighteen engagements, including four major battles and at least four fiercely contested skirmishes.

The conflict began after repeated violations of the Treaty of Fort Laramie once gold was discovered in the hills. The end of the major Indian wars came at the Wounded Knee massacre on December 29, , where the 7th Cavalry attempted to disarm a Sioux man and precipitated an engagement in which about Sioux men, women, and children were killed.

Only thirteen days before, Sitting Bull had been killed with his son Crow Foot in a gun battle with a group of Indian police that had been sent by the American government to arrest him.

As the frontier moved westward, the establishment of U. They served as bases for troops at or near strategic areas, particularly for counteracting the Indian presence.

Fort Laramie and Fort Kearny helped protect immigrants crossing the Great Plains and a series of posts in California protected miners. Forts were constructed to launch attacks against the Sioux.

As Indian reservations sprang up, the military set up forts to protect them. Forts also guarded the Union Pacific and other rail lines.

Fort Omaha , Nebraska, was home to the Department of the Platte , and was responsible for outfitting most Western posts for more than 20 years after its founding in the late s.

Fort Huachuca in Arizona was also originally a frontier post and is still in use by the United States Army. Settlers on their way overland to Oregon and California became targets of Indian threats.

Robert L. Munkres read 66 diaries of parties traveling the Oregon Trail between and to estimate the actual dangers they faced from Indian attacks in Nebraska and Wyoming.

The vast majority of diarists reported no armed attacks at all. However many did report harassment by Indians who begged or demanded tolls, and stole horses and cattle.

A second treaty secured safe passage along the Santa Fe Trail for wagon trains. In return, the tribes would receive, for ten years, annual compensation for damages caused by migrants.

In the Far West settlers began to occupy land in Oregon and California before the federal government secured title from the native tribes, causing considerable friction.

In Utah, the Mormons also moved in before federal ownership was obtained. A new policy of establishing reservations came gradually into shape after the boundaries of the "Indian Territory" began to be ignored.

In providing for Indian reservations, Congress and the Office of Indian Affairs hoped to de-tribalize Native Americans and prepare them for integration with the rest of American society, the "ultimate incorporation into the great body of our citizen population".

Influential pioneer towns included Omaha , Nebraska City , and St. American attitudes towards Indians during this period ranged from malevolence "the only good Indian is a dead Indian" to misdirected humanitarianism Indians live in "inferior" societies and by assimilation into white society they can be redeemed to somewhat realistic Native Americans and settlers could co-exist in separate but equal societies, dividing up the remaining western land.

Conflicts erupted in the s, resulting in various Indian wars. Such as in the case of Oliver Loving , they would sometimes attack cowboys and their cattle if ever caught crossing in the borders of their land.

However, the relationship between cowboys and Native Americans were more mutual than they are portrayed, and the former would occasionally pay a fine of 10 cents per cow for the latter to allow them to travel through their land.

After the Civil War, as the volunteer armies disbanded, the regular army cavalry regiments increased in number from six to ten, among them Custer's U.

The black units, along with others both cavalry and infantry , collectively became known as the Buffalo Soldiers. According to Robert M.

Utley :. The frontier army was a conventional military force trying to control, by conventional military methods, a people that did not behave like conventional enemies and, indeed, quite often were not enemies at all.

This is the most difficult of all military assignments, whether in Africa, Asia, or the American West. Westerners were proud of their leadership in the movement for democracy and equality, a major theme for Frederick Jackson Turner.

The new states of Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Ohio were more democratic than the parent states back East in terms of politics and society.

By the West, especially California and Oregon, led the Progressive movement. Scholars have examined the social history of the west in search of the American character.

The history of Kansas , argued historian Carl L. Becker a century ago, reflects American ideals. He wrote: "The Kansas spirit is the American spirit double distilled.

It is a new grafted product of American individualism, American idealism, American intolerance. Kansas is America in microcosm.

Scholars have compared the emergence of democracy in America with other countries, regarding the frontier experience.

The American frontiersmen relied on individual effort, in the context of very large quantities of unsettled land with weak external enemies.

Israel by contrast, operated in a very small geographical zone, surrounded by more powerful neighbors.

The Jewish pioneer was not building an individual or family enterprise, but was a conscious participant in nation-building, with a high priority on collective and cooperative planned settlements.

The Israeli pioneers brought in American experts on irrigation and agriculture to provide technical advice. However, they rejected the American frontier model in favor of a European model that supported their political and security concerns.

The cities played an essential role in the development of the frontier, as transportation hubs, financial and communications centers, and providers of merchandise, services, and entertainment.

They then shipped the cattle out and cattle drives became short-distance affairs. However, the passenger trains were often the targets of armed gangs.

Denver's economy before had been rooted in mining; it then grew by expanding its role in railroads, wholesale trade, manufacturing, food processing, and servicing the growing agricultural and ranching hinterland.

Denver had always attracted miners, workers, whores, and travelers. Saloons and gambling dens sprung up overnight. The city fathers boasted of its fine theaters, and especially the Tabor Grand Opera House built in Denver gained regional notoriety with its range of bawdy houses, from the sumptuous quarters of renowned madams to the squalid "cribs" located a few blocks away.

Business was good; visitors spent lavishly, then left town. As long as madams conducted their business discreetly, and "crib girls" did not advertise their availability too crudely, authorities took their bribes and looked the other way.

Occasional cleanups and crack downs satisfied the demands for reform. With its giant mountain of copper, Butte, Montana , was the largest, richest, and rowdiest mining camp on the frontier.

It was an ethnic stronghold, with the Irish Catholics in control of politics and of the best jobs at the leading mining corporation Anaconda Copper.

Ring argues that the library was originally a mechanism of social control, "an antidote to the miners' proclivity for drinking, whoring, and gambling".

It was also designed to promote middle-class values and to convince Easterners that Butte was a cultivated city.

European immigrants often built communities of similar religious and ethnic backgrounds. African Americans moved West as soldiers, as well as cowboys, farmhands, saloon workers, cooks, and outlaws.

The Buffalo Soldiers were soldiers in the all-black 9th and 10th Cavalry regiments, and 24th and 25th Infantry Regiments of the U.

They had white officers and served in numerous western forts. About 4, blacks came to California in Gold Rush days. In , after the end of Reconstruction in the South, several thousand Freedmen moved from Southern states to Kansas.

Known as the Exodusters , they were lured by the prospect of good, cheap Homestead Law land and better treatment. The all-black town of Nicodemus, Kansas , which was founded in , was an organized settlement that predates the Exodusters but is often associated with them.

Chinese migrants, many of whom were impoverished peasants, provided the major part of the workforce for the building of the Central Pacific portion of the transcontinental railroad.

Most of them went home by when the railroad was finished. The Chinese were generally forced into self-sufficient "Chinatowns" in cities such as San Francisco , Portland , and Seattle.

By the s, however, Chinatowns had become clean, safe and attractive tourist destinations. The first Japanese arrived in the U.

Japanese were recruited to work on plantations in Hawaii, beginning in By the late 19th Century, more Japanese emigrated to Hawaii and the American mainland.

The Issei, or first-generation Japanese immigrants, were not allowed to become U. This did not change until the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of , known as the McCarran-Walter Act, which allowed Japanese immigrants to become naturalized U.

There were , Japanese Americans in the U. The great majority of Hispanics who had been living in the former territories of New Spain remained and became American citizens in The 10, or so Californios lived in southern California and after were overshadowed by the hundreds of thousands of arrivals from the east.

Those in New Mexico dominated towns and villages that changed little until well into the 20th century. New arrivals from Mexico arrived, especially after the Revolution of terrorized thousands of villages all across Mexico.

Alternate Versions. Rate This. The two best special agents in the Wild West must save President Grant from the clutches of a diabolical, wheelchair-bound, steampunk-savvy, Confederate scientist bent on revenge for losing the Civil War.

Director: Barry Sonnenfeld. Added to Watchlist. From metacritic. High School Icons, Then and Now. Watchlist: with Family.

Terrible movies to watch. Use the HTML below. You must be a registered user to use the IMDb rating plugin. Edit Cast Cast overview, first billed only: Will Smith James West Kevin Kline Arliss Loveless Salma Hayek Rita Escobar M.

Emmet Walsh Coleman Ted Levine Amazonia as Frederique van der Wal Musetta Vander Munitia Sofia Eng Miss Lippenrieder Bai Ling Miss East Garcelle Beauvais Other Reb Rodney A.

Hudson Buck Taylor Plot Keywords: utah buddy movie steampunk george washington character ulysses s. Taglines: It's a whole new west.

July ' Edit Did You Know? Trivia Loveless kills McGrath's men with what he refers to as a "tank". In reality, tanks weren't invented until World War I, around fifty years after this movie takes place.

However, since this is a fictional story, anything is possible. Goofs Initially, the horse cart filled with nitro is facing the saloon, horses on the near side, when West is dangling over the edge of a ridge.

Later, when Loveless detaches the cart from the horses, it is shown as facing away from the saloon with the horses on the far side. Quotes Capt.

James West : For four long years I've been chasing the animal responsible for the massacre at New Liberty.

Willd Wild West Inhaltsangabe & Details

Marshal Artemus Gordon und dem legendären Revolverhelden "West. Während Loveless in die Tiefe stürzt, kann sich West retten. Genug gekalauert. Einen halbwegs durchwaschener Spass, der bald ins lächerliche führt. Gemeinsam mit dem Lokführer Coleman M. Will Smith. Wettrechner System erfahren. Arliss Lovelesseinem exzentrischen Südstaaten -Millionär, der im Amerikanischen Bürgerkrieg Ja Nein Quiz innere Organe und beide Beine verlor und Pferderennen Live auf einen dampfbetriebenen Rollstuhl angewiesen ist. Grant Hudson. Willd Wild West Willd Wild West Wild Wild West ein Film von Barry Sonnenfeld mit Will Smith, Kevin Kline. Inhaltsangabe: Die Vereinigten Staaten im Wilden Westen von Die beiden​. Wild Wild West liegt alle Hoffnung von Präsident Grant auf dem erfindungsreichen U.S. Marshal Artemus Gordon und dem legendären Revolverhelden "West. WILD WILD WEST ist die Leinwandversion einer US-amerikanischen Kultserie die von Oktober'89 bis Mai'91 auf SAT1 im deutschen Fernsehen zu sehen war. Wild Wild West. 46 Bewertungen. Veröffentlicht 1 Jan. Warner Bros. Wähle eine Version aus. Der Wunschliste hinzufügen. Beschreibung. Amerika, kurz.

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Will Smith. Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Studio Warner Bros. Juli in den deutschen Kinos. Dabei ist er jedoch allemal besser als die Nervensäge Will Smith. Michael Ballhaus. Salma Hayek. Zusätzliche Bedingungen Transaktionsbestimmungen. Allerdings müssen sie bei Rita, um deren Gunst beide während der Handlung Y 8 Spiele haben, eine Niederlage hinnehmen: Der entführte Schiff Spiele 1001 ist nicht ihr Vater, sondern ihr Ehemann. Schauspielerinnen und Schauspieler. User folgen 50 Follower Lies die Kritiken. Games Games Games 1000. Seitenverhältnis. Arliss Lightning Games ebenfalls Erfinder, konstruiert aber im Gegensatz zu Gordon futuristische, mechanische Kriegsmaschinen und Waffen, die er gegen die USA einzusetzen gedenkt.

Miguelito Loveless, along with the doctor's two assistants, the lovely Antoinette and the mute and simple-minded giant, Voltaire.

Loveless is planning to take over California from control of Governor Newton Booth , which the doctor claims rightfully belongs to him through his mother's venerable Ranchero family line.

Villain: Miguelito Loveless. Oliver Crawford. Villain: Warren Trevor. Don Taylor. Villain:John Avery. The trail leads to the leader of the gang: Captain Ansel Coffin, a blind man seeking revenge.

His gang uses false lights to lead ships astray, crash them, and then plunder them. Villain: Ansel Coffin. Irving J. Their only clue is a set of fingerprints found on the ankle of a pretty secretary.

Villain:Cluny Ormont. William Tunberg and Fred Freiberger. Villain: Gio Carlotica. Stephen Kandel.

Jim and Artie find that things are not what they seem to be. West is lured into a ghost town filled with lifelike dummies, where Loveless is hatching his latest scheme: the surgical alteration of Janus , one of his assistants.

Once done, Janus would look exactly like James West. Villain: Miguelito Loveless 2. Philip Saltzman and Jason Wingreen.

Robert V. Barron and Jack Marlowe. President Grant. John Launer Mayor , Phyllis Davis Saloon Girl After being crippled in an explosion that he blamed on the other men of his regiment, Colonel "Iron Man" Torres has rebuilt himself as a 19th century " cyborg ".

He is now seeking revenge on those he thinks wronged him — including President Grant. A coolie on the docks Gen. Sumatra, an armaments expert.

Their trail leads them to a British ex-colonel who is planning to take over the Chinese throne. Jim and Artie are assigned to bring him in.

This time he is using exploding toys as part of his scheme to make California a kingdom for children. Lake An attack on a Supreme Court justice leads West and Gordon into a mysterious underground lair filled with deadly life-size marionettes.

Richard Donner. A street preacher Jeremiah P. Threadneedle, dealer in ladies' corsets Aged prison executioner.

The prince insists on visiting a plush spa, only to find that assassins are eagerly awaiting his arrival. Ralph Senensky. Hernandez del Valle Santiago y Sandoval Old lady running a cantina.

He has mastered a formula that can make him move so quickly that he becomes invisible to the naked eye. Loveless for the fourth time.

The doctor has now invented a hallucinatory drug which, when used on Jim, makes him believe that he has shot and killed Artie. We sought words and images to convey that style … baroque, outre, tiffany hues, rich crimsons and forest green, all in the mystery of chiaroscuro.

Charles Bennett. Aide to President Juarez. Edward Di Lorenzo. Loveless, whose latest diabolical invention involves a powder that miniaturizes people.

Jim West and an Indian princess are among his victims. Will a cat bring about the end of Agent West? Dr Loveless appears as a Sheriff of a "ghost town".

Faustina has created human-like robots that are walking time bombs. One of them looks exactly like Jim West and another like Artemus Gordon.

Dan Ullman. Dirk DeJohn, gem expert Mr. Spock type. She claims that her ship needs gold for fuel. Wynant Pinto The town of Justice, Nevada, is hangout for a group of international criminals headed by Lucrece Posey, who is planning on leading her group into a world-wide criminal organization-her gang is made up of a pyromaniac; a thuggish pugilist; a South American Assassin; a Cowboy outlaw; an explosives expert, a mad Cossack and a Confidence Man.

Unfortunately for them a certain two secret service agents on vacation happen to be passing through, and it's up to the pair to battle them into submission.

Convict;Pierre Gaspard, former legionnaire. Jim and Artie infiltrate a prison to rescue a fellow agent from a vicious commandant.

Loveless a. Robin Hood of Sherwood forest, whose latest scheme involves a chemical that kills plant life and a suit of medieval armor.

While resting for the night, Artie has a strange dream where he, Jim, and the sheriff chase their prisoner to an old abandoned mansion which is haunted by the spirit of a dead woman.

In reality, however, he is tracking down a secret league of assassins. Shimon Wincelberg. Duelist Jack Maitland no make-up, but a different character.

White Robber , Howard Wright Professor Jim and Artie encounter Colonel Vautrain, a crippled, legless former Confederate officer who has mastered the ability to travel through time.

His plan is to go back in time and alter history, thus not only restoring his legs but also having the Confederate Army win the war—by killing Ulysses Grant.

Elon Packard and Norman Hudis. Raven, who is developing a secret weapon and also a member of a tontine , an investment group whose bylaws state that the last surviving member of the group will receive the group's assets.

This time around the count is attempting to acquire a wind-up bird that contains the Philosopher's Stone. Events take an interesting turn when Jim follows the trail to a gypsy camp.

Russian immigrant Theodore Rimsky. In the course of their duty the two are drugged and end up in Russia — or so it seems.

A Jewish tailor. They find that all the victims are linked to a matchmaker named Emma Valentine. Jim is held captive in Emma's matchmaking machine--his ideal woman is a combination of Aphrodite ; Helen of Troy and Lola Montez.

Agnes Moorehead won the series' only Emmy for her performance in this episode. Their investigation pits them against an evil super-genius.

Loveless for the seventh time. His latest invention can transport real people in and out of the two-dimensional world of paintings.

The idea was later used by Zygons in the Doctor Who 50th anniversary special episode The Day of the Doctor to invade London via an art gallery.

Meanwhile, Gordon is escorting President Grant to dedication of a statue of the late Colonel Wayne Gibson in the very same town.

Daniel Mainwaring. The deaths of four military officers and the mysterious sinking of the cruiser Youngstown lead them to believe that the king's life may be in danger.

Can Jim stop Trask from turning President Grant into a mindless zombie? However, the evil Talamantes with a pack of werewolves has kidnapped Stefan's daughter, Leandra, and will only release her if Stefan renounces the throne.

Loveless is back for the eighth time with yet another plan to rule the world. His scheme this time around uses mock-ups of the prisons, armories, and the United States Treasury to train his henchmen to take over these resources upon his command.

Constitution document has been stolen by a dangerous revolutionary named Victor Freemantle. West and Gordon are sent to Texas to recover it.

They find Freemantle is not the mastermind behind the plot. Michael Caffey. Edward J. However, once there, he finds that O'Riley is in control of the fort and is holding the fort's major and his men captive.

Their plan is to return to Texas with the assassin they have captured, but first they must deal with the merciless Colonel Barbossa. While there, they meet up with Triste, and Miguelito's next of kin, Dr.

Liebknicht, a Swiss neurologist who strikingly resembles his nephew. Denne Bart Petitclerc. However, after their arrival the horse is stolen by a group of outlaw bandits, jeopardizing the relationship between the two countries.

State Department is returning a valuable samurai sword to its rightful owner, a Japanese prince, the sword is stolen by a group of assailants.

To avoid damaging U. After a series of various encounters with those after the sword, Jim faces the villain in a dramatic sword fight.

James B. After a man is found guilty and sentenced to hang, the agents uncover information that points to a frame-up.

Max Ehrlich. Marvin Chomsky. Robert E. And now it is aimed at Denver. Their leader is Michael Trayne, a vicius killer back in town after three years in jail.

Their leader seems to be their territorial Governor, but there is a more sinister power behind the scenes of all the illegal activities -- the final confration of West and Gordon with the chief villain.

Robinson and Ron Silverman. Shortly afterwards, he is recruited by some member of the underworld who seeks to capitalize on his misfortune.

He awakens in a strange deserted town filled with assailants wearing masks in the likeness of Emmett Stark, an escaped murderer whom West had imprisoned years earlier — and now Stark wants revenge.

Lawrence Dobkin. Meanwhile, Jim has been injured in the attack on the stage and is struggling with amnesia.

Artie must find both his friend and the vaccine before a full-scale epidemic hits. Gordon helps West literally bring down the curtain on Crotty.

Barrows Johann Jim and Artie visit the plantation of a U. Senator who has a mysterious family past that involved a scientist's experiments with apes.

The weapon used in the attempt was one stolen in recent raids on government and territorial armories. And improperly-made wine leads to a monastery under illegal occupation.

West and Gordon find that it is a kinetoscope showing Grant actually a double signing a secret agreement with the representative of an enemy nation.

Hinterstoisser shows the kinetescope before an attentive crowd. Crane Mr. Hassan Amir Ortuglo, Arab dealer in exotic weapontry.

Huff 4th Guard West and Gordon are assigned to rescue Dr. Crane and his daughter. The doctor has invented a new "doomsday formula" which could spell the end of the United States if it falls into the wrong hands.

In an attempt to cure this disorder, their family physician has been kidnapping people afflicted with the same disorder and using them to test a serum he has prepared.

Jackson Gillis. However, they are sidetracked in the home of Rufus Kraus and are pulled into a night of deadly parlor games. Bartlett, is killed, apparently the victim of a strange tentacled sea creature.

It soon becomes apparent to them that an insidious threat is behind Bartlett's killing. Vitanza Grady Jim travels to the town of Epitaph to arrest Norbert Plank, the chief bookkeeper for the corrupt and powerful syndicate that owns the town's mining company.

Through Plank, the agents stand to get hold of valuable records about the syndicate's illegal activities. Captain Hull, formerly of her Majesty's frigate, the Northcumberland.

Their trail leads them to Rosie, a beautiful young dancer, who is wearing the ruby on her toe. Bernard McEveety. The elderly Dr. Crane General Robert E.

Their adventures lead them into the underground mines where strange things occur, including an encounter with an aged Confederate soldier who is unaware that the war ended many years before.

They receive some dubious help from Bosley Cranston, a meek and seemingly incompetent agent on his first field assignment.

However, Cranston has some special talents that will prove invaluable. They discover that the destruction is being caused by a giant tuning fork radiating powerful sound waves.

This time around the doctor is behind a series of kidnappings. His victims are all people he felt had wronged him in the past and now he is plotting his revenge.

Their trail leads to the prison at Alcatraz , which has been taken over by the evil Din Chang. Paul Stanley. They track the bandits to a Mexican village where the thieves are hiding under the guise of an old Mexican legend about Cortez.

Jim and Artie, not believing in the return of the god Cortez, are determined to find their way into the dormant volcano where the thugs are hiding.

The incidents lead the two agents to "The Raven", group led by Thaddeus Toombs and a man called Tycho. West and Harper then continue to infiltrate, undermine, and bring the group to justice.

Herb Wallerstein. While there they unravel a plot involving the secret Order of Lucia and also reveal who among their new acquaintances is playing a role on and off the stage.

While there he becomes reacquainted with an old friend, British detective Sir Nigel Scott. The agents find themselves pursued by the evil Count Balkovitch, who is looking for an icon he needs to possess in order to hold power in Karovnia.

Sayls Saloon Girl 2 , Conrad Falk Donald, Averi's fiance — who is not at all like Jim West West deals with the kidnapping of the Governor's daughter while Gordon rushes to find Jim to inoculate him from the disease one of the criminals was carrying.

All were involved in a scheme to dump stock, cause a panic, and make tons of money off of the cheap stock.

Outstanding Supporting Actress — Drama series. Outstanding Lead Actor — Drama series. June 6, [32]. March 20, [33]. Then it sent surveyors to map and document the land.

Transportation was a key issue and the Army especially the Army Corps of Engineers was given full responsibility for facilitating navigation on the rivers.

The steamboat, first used on the Ohio River in , made possible inexpensive travel using the river systems, especially the Mississippi and Missouri rivers and their tributaries.

For example, the Army's steamboat "Western Engineer" of combined a very shallow draft with one of the earliest stern wheels. In —25, Colonel Henry Atkinson developed keelboats with hand-powered paddle wheels.

The federal postal system played a crucial role in national expansion. It facilitated expansion into the West by creating an inexpensive, fast, convenient communication system.

Letters from early settlers provided information and boosterism to encourage increased migration to the West, helped scattered families stay in touch and provide neutral help, assisted entrepreneurs to find business opportunities, and made possible regular commercial relationships between merchants and the West and wholesalers and factories back east.

The postal service likewise assisted the Army in expanding control over the vast western territories. The widespread circulation of important newspapers by mail, such as the New York Weekly Tribune , facilitated coordination among politicians in different states.

The postal service helped to integrate already established areas with the frontier, creating a spirit of nationalism and providing a necessary infrastructure.

The army early on assumed the mission of protecting settlers along with the Westward Expansion Trails , a policy that was described by Secretary of War John B.

Floyd in [58]. There was a debate at the time about the best size for the forts with Jefferson Davis , Winfield Scott , and Thomas Jesup supporting forts that were larger but fewer in number than Floyd.

Floyd's plan was more expensive but had the support of settlers and the general public who preferred that the military remain as close as possible.

The frontier area was vast and even Davis conceded that "concentration would have exposed portions of the frontier to Indian hostilities without any protection.

Government and private enterprise sent many explorers to the West. In —, Army lieutenant Zebulon Pike — led a party of 20 soldiers to find the headwaters of the Mississippi.

On his return, Pike sighted the peak in Colorado named after him. In , naturalists Thomas Nuttall — and John Bradbury — traveled up the Missouri River documenting and drawing plant and animal life.

Swiss artist Karl Bodmer made compelling landscapes and portraits. He displayed a talent for exploration and a genius at self-promotion that gave him the sobriquet of "Pathmarker of the West" and led him to the presidential nomination of the new Republican Party in He crossed through the Rocky Mountains by five different routes and mapped parts of Oregon and California.

In —, he played a role in conquering California. It caught the public imagination and inspired many to head west. Goetzman says it was "monumental in its breadth, a classic of exploring literature".

While colleges were springing up across the Northeast, there was little competition on the western frontier for Transylvania University , founded in Lexington, Kentucky, in It boasted of a law school in addition to its undergraduate and medical programs.

Transylvania attracted politically ambitious young men from across the Southwest, including 50 who became United States senators, representatives, 36 governors, and 34 ambassadors, as well as Jefferson Davis, the president of the Confederacy.

The established Eastern churches were slow to meet the needs of the frontier. The Presbyterians and Congregationalists, since they depended on well-educated ministers, were shorthanded in evangelizing the frontier.

They set up a Plan of Union of to combine resources on the frontier. The local pioneers responded enthusiastically to these events and, in effect, evolved their populist religions, especially during the Second Great Awakening — , which featured outdoor camp meetings lasting a week or more and which introduced many people to organized religion for the first time.

One of the largest and most famous camp meetings took place at Cane Ridge, Kentucky , in The local Baptists set up small independent churches—Baptists abjured centralized authority; each local church was founded on the principle of independence of the local congregation.

On the other hand, bishops of the well-organized, centralized Methodists assigned circuit riders to specific areas for several years at a time, then moved them to fresh territory.

Several new denominations were formed, of which the largest was the Disciples of Christ. Historian Mark Wyman calls Wisconsin a "palimpsest" of layer upon layer of peoples and forces, each imprinting permanent influences.

He identified these layers as multiple "frontiers" over three centuries: Native American frontier, French frontier, English frontier, fur-trade frontier, mining frontier, and the logging frontier.

Finally, the coming of the railroad brought the end of the frontier. Frederick Jackson Turner grew up in Wisconsin during its last frontier stage, and in his travels around the state, he could see the layers of social and political development.

One of Turner's last students, Merle Curti used an in-depth analysis of local Wisconsin history to test Turner's thesis about democracy.

Turner's view was that American democracy, "involved widespread participation in the making of decisions affecting the common life, the development of initiative and self-reliance, and equality of economic and cultural opportunity.

It thus also involved Americanization of immigrant. He found that even landless young farmworkers were soon able to obtain their farms.

Free land on the frontier, therefore, created opportunity and democracy, for both European immigrants as well as old stock Yankees.

From the s to the s, pioneers moved into the new lands that stretched from Kentucky to Alabama to Texas. Most were farmers who moved in family groups.

Historian Louis Hacker shows how wasteful the first generation of pioneers was; they were too ignorant to cultivate the land properly and when the natural fertility of virgin land was used up, they sold out and moved west to try again.

Hacker describes that in Kentucky about Farms were for sale with from ten to fifty acres cleared, possessing log houses, peach and sometimes apple orchards, enclosed in fences, and having plenty of standing timber for fuel.

The land was sown in wheat and corn, which were the staples, while hemp [for making rope] was being cultivated in increasing quantities in the fertile river bottoms Yet, on the whole, it was an agricultural society without skill or resources.

It committed all those sins which characterize wasteful and ignorant husbandry. Grass seed was not sown for hay and as a result, the farm animals had to forage for themselves in the forests; the fields were not permitted to lie in pasturage; a single crop was planted in the soil until the land was exhausted; the manure was not returned to the fields; only a small part of the farm was brought under cultivation, the rest being permitted to stand in timber.

Instruments of cultivation were rude and clumsy and only too few, many of them being made on the farm. It is plain why the American frontier settler was on the move continually.

It was, not his fear of too close contact with the comforts and restraints of a civilized society that stirred him into a ceaseless activity, nor merely the chance of selling out at a profit to the coming wave of settlers; it was his wasting land that drove him on.

Hunger was the goad. The pioneer farmer's ignorance, his inadequate facilities for cultivation, his limited means, of transport necessitated his frequent changes of scene.

He could succeed only with virgin soil. Hacker adds that the second wave of settlers reclaimed the land, repaired the damage, and practiced more sustainable agriculture.

Historian Frederick Jackson Turner explored the individualistic worldview and values of the first generation:.

What they objected to was arbitrary obstacles, artificial limitations upon the freedom of each member of this frontier folk to work out his career without fear or favor.

What they instinctively opposed was the crystallization of differences, the monopolization of opportunity, and the fixing of that monopoly by government or by social customs.

The road must be open. The game must be played according to the rules. There must be no artificial stifling of equality of opportunity, no closed doors to the able, no stopping the free game before it was played to the end.

Manifest Destiny was the belief that the United States was preordained to expand from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific coast.

The concept was expressed during Colonial times, but the term was coined in the s by a popular magazine which editorialized, "the fulfillment of our manifest destiny In the s the Tyler and Polk administrations —49 successfully promoted this nationalistic doctrine.

However, the Whig Party , which represented business and financial interests, stood opposed to Manifest Destiny.

Whig leaders such as Henry Clay and Abraham Lincoln called for deepening the society through modernization and urbanization instead of simple horizontal- expansion.

John Quincy Adams , an anti-slavery Whig, felt the Texas annexation in to be "the heaviest calamity that ever befell me and my country".

Mexico became independent of Spain in and took over Spain's northern possessions stretching from Texas to California. Santa Fe was also the trailhead for the "El Camino Real" the King's Highway , a trade route which carried American manufactured goods southward deep into Mexico and returned silver, furries, and mules northward not to be confused with another "Camino Real" which connected the missions in California.

The Spanish and Mexican governments attracted American settlers to Texas with generous terms. Stephen F. Austin became an "impresario", receiving contracts from the Mexican officials to bring in immigrants.

In doing so, he also became the de facto political and military commander of the area. Tensions rose, however, after an abortive attempt to establish the independent nation of Fredonia in William Travis , leading the "war party", advocated for independence from Mexico, while the "peace party" led by Austin attempted to get more autonomy within the current relationship.

When Mexican president Santa Anna shifted alliances and joined the conservative Centralist party, he declared himself dictator and ordered soldiers into Texas to curtail new immigration and unrest.

However, immigration continued and 30, Anglos with 3, slaves were settled in Texas by Remember Goliad". The U. Congress declined to annex Texas, stalemated by contentious arguments over slavery and regional power.

Thus, the Republic of Texas remained an independent power for nearly a decade before it was annexed as the 28th state in The government of Mexico, however, viewed Texas as a runaway province and asserted its ownership.

Mexico refused to recognize the independence of Texas in , but the U. Mexico threatened war if Texas joined the U. American negotiators were turned away by a Mexican government in turmoil.

When the Mexican army killed 16 American soldiers in disputed territory war was at hand. Whigs , such as Congressman Abraham Lincoln denounced the war, but it was quite popular outside New England.

The Mexican strategy was defensive; the American strategy was a three-pronged offensive, using large numbers of volunteer soldiers.

From the main American base at New Orleans, General Zachary Taylor led forces into northern Mexico, winning a series of battles that ensued.

Navy transported General Winfield Scott to Veracruz. He then marched his 12,man force west to Mexico City, winning the final battle at Chapultepec.

Talk of acquiring all of Mexico fell away when the army discovered the Mexican political and cultural values were so alien to America's.

As the Cincinnati Herald asked, what would the U. The Gadsden Purchase in added southern Arizona, which was needed for a railroad route to California.

In all Mexico ceded half a million square miles 1. Managing the new territories and dealing with the slavery issue caused intense controversy, particularly over the Wilmot Proviso , which would have outlawed slavery in the new territories.

Congress never passed it, but rather temporarily resolved the issue of slavery in the West with the Compromise of California entered the Union in as a free state; the other areas remained territories for many years.

The new state grew rapidly as migrants poured into the fertile cotton lands of east Texas. The central area of the state was developed more by subsistence farmers who seldom owned slaves.

Texas in its Wild West days attracted men who could shoot straight and possessed the zest for adventure, "for masculine renown, patriotic service, martial glory, and meaningful deaths".

In about 10, Californios Hispanics lived in California, primarily on cattle ranches in what is now the Los Angeles area. A few hundred foreigners were scattered in the northern districts, including some Americans.

With the outbreak of war with Mexico in the U. Army unit, as well as naval forces, and quickly took control.

Thousands of "Forty-Niners" reached California, by sailing around South America or taking a short-cut through disease-ridden Panama , or walked the California trail.

The population soared to over , in , mostly in the gold districts that stretched into the mountains east of San Francisco. Housing in San Francisco was at a premium, and abandoned ships whose crews had headed for the mines were often converted to temporary lodging.

In the goldfields themselves, living conditions were primitive, though the mild climate proved attractive.

Supplies were expensive and food poor, typical diets consisting mostly of pork, beans, and whiskey. These highly male, transient communities with no established institutions were prone to high levels of violence, drunkenness, profanity, and greed-driven behavior.

Without courts or law officers in the mining communities to enforce claims and justice, miners developed their ad hoc legal system, based on the "mining codes" used in other mining communities abroad.

Each camp had its own rules and often handed out justice by popular vote, sometimes acting fairly and at times exercising vigilantes; with Indians, Mexicans, and Chinese generally receiving the harshest sentences.

The gold rush radically changed the California economy and brought in an array of professionals, including precious metal specialists, merchants, doctors, and attorneys, who added to the population of miners, saloon keepers, gamblers, and prostitutes.

A San Francisco newspaper stated, "The whole country Violent bandits often preyed upon the miners, such as the case of Jonathan R. Davis ' killing of eleven bandits single-handedly.

In a few years, nearly all of the independent miners were displaced as mines were purchased and run by mining companies, who then hired low-paid salaried miners.

As gold became harder to find and more difficult to extract, individual prospectors gave way to paid work gangs, specialized skills, and mining machinery.

Bigger mines, however, caused greater environmental damage. In the mountains, shaft mining predominated, producing large amounts of waste.

Beginning in , at the end of the '49 gold rush, through , hydraulic mining was used. Despite huge profits being made, it fell into the hands of a few capitalists, displaced numerous miners, vast amounts of waste entered river systems, and did heavy ecological damage to the environment.

Hydraulic mining ended when the public outcry over the destruction of farmlands led to the outlawing of this practice.

The mountainous areas of the triangle from New Mexico to California to South Dakota contained hundreds of hard rock mining sites, where prospectors discovered gold, silver, copper and other minerals as well as some soft-rock coal.

Temporary mining camps sprang up overnight; most became ghost towns when the ores were depleted. Prospectors spread out and hunted for gold and silver along the Rockies and in the southwest.

The wealth from silver, more than from gold, fueled the maturation of San Francisco in the s and helped the rise of some of its wealthiest families, such as that of George Hearst.

They moved in large groups under an experienced wagonmaster, bringing their clothing, farm supplies, weapons, and animals.

These wagon trains followed major rivers, crossed prairies and mountains, and typically ended in Oregon and California. Pioneers generally attempted to complete the journey during a single warm season, usually for six months.

By , when the first migrant wagon train was organized in Independence, Missouri , a wagon trail had been cleared to Fort Hall, Idaho. Trails were cleared further and further west, eventually reaching the Willamette Valley in Oregon.

This network of wagon trails leading to the Pacific Northwest was later called the Oregon Trail. The eastern half of the route was also used by travelers on the California Trail from , Mormon Trail from , and Bozeman Trail from before they turned off to their separate destinations.

In the "Wagon Train of ", some to 1, emigrants headed for Oregon; missionary Marcus Whitman led the wagons on the last leg. Some did so because they were discouraged and defeated.

Some returned with bags of gold and silver. Most were returning to pick up their families and move them all back west. These "gobacks" were a major source of information and excitement about the wonders and promises—and dangers and disappointments—of the far West.

Not all emigrants made it to their destination. The dangers of the overland route were numerous: snakebites, wagon accidents, violence from other travelers, suicide, malnutrition, stampedes, Indian attacks, a variety of diseases dysentery , typhoid , and cholera were among the most common , exposure, avalanches, etc.

One particularly well-known example of the treacherous nature of the journey is the story of the ill-fated Donner Party , which became trapped in the Sierra Nevada mountains during the winter of — in which nearly half of the 90 people traveling with the group died from starvation and exposure, and some resorted to cannibalism to survive.

There were also frequent attacks from bandits and highwaymen , such as the infamous Harpe brothers who patrolled the frontier routes and targeted migrant groups.

In Missouri and Illinois, animosity between the Mormon settlers and locals grew, which would mirror those in other states such as Utah years later.

Violence finally erupted on October 24, , when militias from both sides clashed and a mass killing of Mormons in Livingston County occurred 6 days later.

A hundred rural Mormon settlements sprang up in what Young called " Deseret ", which he ruled as a theocracy. It later became Utah Territory.

Young's Salt Lake City settlement served as the hub of their network, which reached into neighboring territories as well.

The communalism and advanced farming practices of the Mormons enabled them to succeed. The great threat to the Mormons in Utah was the U.

The Republican Party swore to destroy polygamy, which it saw as an affront to religious, cultural, and moral values of modern civilization.

Confrontations verged on open warfare in the late s as President Buchanan sent in troops. Although there were no military battles fought, and negotiations led to a stand down, violence still escalated and there were several casualties.

Finally, in , the Church leadership announced polygamy was no longer a central tenet, and a compromise was reached, with Utah becoming a state and the Mormons dividing into Republicans and Democrats.

The federal government provided subsidies for the development of mail and freight delivery, and by , Congress authorized road improvements and an overland mail service to California.

The new commercial wagon trains service primarily hauled freight. In John Butterfield —69 established a stage service that went from Saint Louis to San Francisco in 24 days along a southern route.

William Russell, hoping to get a government contract for more rapid mail delivery service, started the Pony Express in , cutting delivery time to ten days.

In Congress passed the Land-Grant Telegraph Act which financed the construction of Western Union's transcontinental telegraph lines.

Hiram Sibley , Western Union's head, negotiated exclusive agreements with railroads to run telegraph lines along their right-of-way.

Eight years before the transcontinental railroad opened, the First Transcontinental Telegraph linked Omaha, Nebraska, to San Francisco on October 24, Constitutionally, Congress could not deal with slavery in the states but it did have jurisdiction in the western territories.

California unanimously rejected slavery in and became a free state. New Mexico allowed slavery, but it was rarely seen there.

Kansas was off-limits to slavery by the Compromise of Free Soil elements feared that if slavery were allowed rich planters would buy up the best lands and work them with gangs of slaves, leaving little opportunity for free white men to own farms.

Few Southern planters were interested in Kansas, but the idea that slavery was illegal there implied they had a second-class status that was intolerable to their sense of honor, and seemed to violate the principle of state's rights.

With the passage of the extremely controversial Kansas—Nebraska Act in , Congress left the decision up to the voters on the ground in Kansas.

Across the North, a new major party was formed to fight slavery: the Republican Party , with numerous westerners in leadership positions, most notably Abraham Lincoln of Illinois.

To influence the territorial decision, anti-slavery elements also called "Jayhawkers" or "Free-soilers" financed the migration of politically determined settlers.

But pro-slavery advocates fought back with pro-slavery settlers from Missouri. The antislavery forces took over by , as Kansas became a free state.

The episode demonstrated that a democratic compromise between North and South over slavery was impossible and served to hasten the Civil War.

Despite its large territory, the trans-Mississippi West had a small population and its wartime story has to a large extent been underplayed in the historiography of the American Civil War.

The Confederacy engaged in several important campaigns in the West. However, Kansas, a major area of conflict building up to the war, was the scene of only one battle, at Mine Creek.

But its proximity to Confederate lines enabled pro-Confederate guerrillas, such as Quantrill's Raiders , to attack Union strongholds and massacre the residents.

In Texas, citizens voted to join the Confederacy; anti-war Germans were hanged. Confederate Arizona was created by Arizona citizens who wanted protection against Apache raids after the United States Army units were moved out.

The Confederacy then sets its sight to gain control of the New Mexico Territory. General Henry Hopkins Sibley was tasked for the campaign, and together with his New Mexico Army , marched right up the Rio Grande in an attempt to take the mineral wealth of Colorado as well as California.

The First Regiment of Volunteers discovered the rebels, and they immediately warned and joined the Yankees at Fort Union.

The Battle of Glorieta Pass soon erupted, and the Union ended the Confederate campaign and the area west of Texas remained in Union hands.

Missouri , a Union state where slavery was legal, became a battleground when the pro-secession governor, against the vote of the legislature, led troops to the federal arsenal at St.

Louis ; he was aided by Confederate forces from Arkansas and Louisiana. Louis and all of Missouri for the Union.

The state was the scene of numerous raids and guerrilla warfare in the west. Army after established a series of military posts across the frontier, designed to stop warfare among Indian tribes or between Indians and settlers.

Throughout the 19th century, Army officers typically served built their careers in peacekeeper roles moving from fort to fort until retirement. Actual combat experience was uncommon for any one soldier.

The most dramatic conflict was the Sioux war in Minnesota in when Dakota tribes systematically attacked German farms to drive out the settlers. The state militia fought back and Lincoln sent in federal troops.

The federal government tried Indians for murder, and were convicted and sentenced to death. Lincoln pardoned the majority, but 38 leaders were hanged.

The decreased presence of Union troops in the West left behind untrained militias; hostile tribes used the opportunity to attack settlers. The militia struck back hard, most notably by attacking the winter quarters of the Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians, filled with women and children, at the Sand Creek massacre in eastern Colorado in late Kit Carson and the U.

Army in trapped the entire Navajo tribe in New Mexico, where they had been raiding settlers and put them on a reservation.

The result by was millions of new farms in the Plains states, many operated by new immigrants from Germany and Scandinavia.

With the war over and slavery abolished, the federal government focused on improving the governance of the territories. It subdivided several territories, preparing them for statehood, following the precedents set by the Northwest Ordinance of It standardized procedures and the supervision of territorial governments, taking away some local powers, and imposing much "red tape", growing the federal bureaucracy significantly.

Federal involvement in the territories was considerable. In addition to direct subsidies, the federal government maintained military posts, provided safety from Indian attacks, bankrolled treaty obligations, conducted surveys and land sales, built roads, staffed land offices, made harbor improvements, and subsidized overland mail delivery.

Territorial citizens came to both decry federal power and local corruption, and at the same time, lament that more federal dollars were not sent their way.

Territorial governors were political appointees and beholden to Washington so they usually governed with a light hand, allowing the legislatures to deal with the local issues.

In addition to his role as civil governor, a territorial governor was also a militia commander, a local superintendent of Indian affairs, and the state liaison with federal agencies.

The legislatures, on the other hand, spoke for the local citizens and they were given considerable leeway by the federal government to make local law.

These improvements to governance still left plenty of room for profiteering. As Mark Twain wrote while working for his brother, the secretary of Nevada, "The government of my country snubs honest simplicity but fondles artistic villainy, and I think I might have developed into a very capable pickpocket if I had remained in the public service a year or two.

In acquiring, preparing, and distributing public land to private ownership, the federal government generally followed the system set forth by the Land Ordinance of Federal exploration and scientific teams would undertake reconnaissance of the land and determine Native American habitation.

Through treaties, the land titles would be ceded by the resident tribes. Townships would be formed from the lots and sold at public auction.

As part of public policy, the government would award public land to certain groups such as veterans, through the use of "land script".

As a counter to land speculators, farmers formed "claims clubs" to enable them to buy larger tracts than the acre 0. In , Congress passed three important bills that transformed the land system.

The Homestead Act granted acres 0. The only cost was a modest filing fee. The law was especially important in the settling of the Plains states.

Many took a free homestead and others purchased their land from railroads at low rates. The Pacific Railroad Act of provided for the land needed to build the transcontinental railroad.

The land was given the railroads alternated with government-owned tracts saved for free distribution to homesteaders. Railroads had up to five years to sell or mortgage their land, after tracks were laid, after which unsold land could be purchased by anyone.

Often railroads sold some of their government acquired land to homesteaders immediately to encourage settlement and the growth of markets the railroads would then be able to serve.

Nebraska railroads in the s were strong boosters of lands along their routes. They sent agents to Germany and Scandinavia with package deals that included cheap transportation for the family as well as its furniture and farm tools, and they offered long-term credit at low rates.

Boosterism succeeded in attracting adventurous American and European families to Nebraska , helping them purchase land grant parcels on good terms.

The selling price depended on such factors as soil quality, water, and distance from the railroad. The Morrill Act of provided land grants to states to begin colleges of agriculture and mechanical arts engineering.

Black colleges became eligible for these land grants in The Act succeeded in its goals to open new universities and make farming more scientific and profitable.

In the s government-sponsored surveys to chart the remaining unexplored regions of the West, and to plan possible routes for a transcontinental railroad.

Regionalism animated debates in Congress regarding the choice of a northern, central, or southern route. Engineering requirements for the rail route were an adequate supply of water and wood, and as nearly-level route as possible, given the weak locomotives of the era.

In the s, proposals to build a transcontinental failed because of Congressional disputes over slavery. With the secession of the Confederate states in , the modernizers in the Republican party took over Congress and wanted a line to link to California.

Private companies were to build and operate the line. Construction would be done by unskilled laborers who would live in temporary camps along the way.

Immigrants from China and Ireland did most of the construction work. Theodore Judah , the chief engineer of the Central Pacific surveyed the route from San Francisco east.

Judah's tireless lobbying efforts in Washington were largely responsible for the passage of the Pacific Railroad Act , which authorized construction of both the Central Pacific and the Union Pacific which built west from Omaha.

The line was completed in May Coast-to-coast passenger travel in 8 days now replaced wagon trains or sea voyages that took 6 to 10 months and cost much more.

The road was built with mortgages from New York, Boston, and London, backed by land grants. There were no federal cash subsidies, But there was a loan to the Central Pacific that was eventually repaid at six percent interest.

The federal government offered land-grants in a checkerboard pattern. The railroad sold every-other square, with the government opening its half to homesteaders.

Local and state governments also aided the financing. Most of the manual laborers on the Central Pacific were new arrivals from China.

He concludes that senior officials quickly realized the high degree of cleanliness and reliability of the Chinese. Ong explores whether or not the Chinese Railroad Workers were exploited by the railroad, with whites in better positions.

He finds the railroad set different wage rates for whites and Chinese and used the latter in the more menial and dangerous jobs, such as the handling and the pouring of nitroglycerin.

Building the railroad required six main activities: surveying the route, blasting a right of way, building tunnels and bridges, clearing and laying the roadbed, laying the ties and rails, and maintaining and supplying the crews with food and tools.

The work was highly physical, using horse-drawn plows and scrapers, and manual picks, axes, sledgehammers, and handcarts. A few steam-driven machines, such as shovels, were used.

For blasting, they used black powder. Six transcontinental railroads were built in the Gilded Age plus two in Canada ; they opened up the West to farmers and ranchers.

All but the Great Northern of James J. Hill relied on land grants. The financial stories were often complex. For example, the Northern Pacific received its major land grant in Financier Jay Cooke — was in charge until when he went bankrupt.

Federal courts, however, kept bankrupt railroads in operation. In Henry Villard — took over and finally completed the line to Seattle.

But the line went bankrupt in the Panic of and Hill took it over. He then merged several lines with financing from J.

Morgan , but President Theodore Roosevelt broke them up in In the first year of operation, —70, , passengers made the long trip.

Settlers were encouraged with promotions to come West on free scouting trips to buy railroad land on easy terms spread over several years.

The railroads had "Immigration Bureaus" which advertised package low-cost deals including passage and land on easy terms for farmers in Germany and Scandinavia.

The prairies, they were promised, did not mean backbreaking toil because "settling on the prairie which is ready for the plow is different from plunging into a region covered with timber".

All manufacturers benefited from the lower costs of transportation and the much larger radius of business. White concludes with a mixed verdict. The transcontinental did open up the West to settlement, brought in many thousands of high-tech, highly paid workers and managers, created thousands of towns and cities, oriented the nation onto an east-west axis, and proved highly valuable for the nation as a whole.

On the other hand, too many were built, and they were built too far ahead of actual demand. The result was a bubble that left heavy losses to investors and led to poor management practices.

By contrast, as White notes, the lines in the Midwest and East supported by a very large population base, fostered farming, industry, and mining while generating steady profits and receiving few government benefits.

The new railroads provided the opportunity for migrants to go out and take a look, with special family tickets, the cost of which could be applied to land purchases offered by the railroads.

Farming the plains was indeed more difficult than back east. Water management was more critical, lightning fires were more prevalent, the weather was more extreme, rainfall was less predictable.

The fearful stayed home. The actual migrants looked beyond fears of the unknown. Their chief motivation to move west was to find a better economic life than the one they had.

Farmers sought larger, cheaper, and more fertile land; merchants and tradesmen sought new customers and new leadership opportunities.

Laborers wanted higher paying work and better conditions. As settlers move West, they have to face challenges along the way, such as the lack of wood for housing, bad weather like blizzards and droughts, and fearsome tornadoes.

One of the greatest plagues that hit the homesteaders was the Locust Plague which devastated the Great Plains. On April 22, over , settlers and cattlemen known as "boomers" [] lined up at the border, and when the army's guns and bugles giving the signal, began a mad dash to stake their claims in the Land Run of A witness wrote, "The horsemen had the best of it from the start.

It was a fine race for a few minutes, but soon the riders began to spread out like a fan, and by the time they reached the horizon they were scattered about as far as the eye could see".

In the same manner, millions of acres of additional land were opened up and settled in the following four years. Fearful of a takeover of Alaska then Russian America from the British Army based in British North America and due to lack of economic interests, Russia was eager to get rid of the territory it held onto since Secretary of State William Seward negotiated with the Russians to acquire the tremendous landmass of Alaska, an area roughly one-fifth the size of the rest of the United States.

On March 30, , the U. The transfer ceremony was completed in Sitka on October 18, , as Russian soldiers handed over the territory to the United States Army.

Critics at the time decried the purchase as "Seward's Folly", reasoning that there were no natural resources in the new territory and no one can be bothered to live in such a cold, icy climate.

Although the development and settlement of Alaska grew slowly, the discovery of goldfields during the Klondike Gold Rush in , Nome Gold Rush in , and Fairbanks Gold Rush in brought thousands of miners into the territory, thus propelling Alaska's prosperity for decades to come.

Major oil discoveries in the late 20th century made the state rich. That same day, the coup organizers created the Provisional Government of Hawaii and appointed Hawaiian jurist Sanford Ballard Dole as the islands' first President, hoping that Hawaii would be annexed by the United States.

Within 48 hours after the overthrow, the new Hawaiian government was recognized by all nations with diplomatic ties to the Kingdom of Hawaii, including the U.

Cleveland was unwilling to overthrow the government by force, and his successor, William McKinley , negotiated a treaty with the Republic of Hawaii in In April , the Spanish—American War broke out, and the strategic use of a naval base at Pearl Harbor in the Pacific during the war convinced the U.

It was signed into law by President McKinley three days later and came into effect on August 12, , officially creating the Territory of Hawaii.

Indian wars have occurred throughout the United States though the conflicts are generally separated into two categories; the Indian wars east of the Mississippi River and the Indian wars west of the Mississippi.

Bureau of the Census provided an estimate of deaths:. The Indian wars under the government of the United States have been more than 40 in number. They have cost the lives of about 19, white men, women and children, including those killed in individual combats, and the lives of about 30, Indians.

The actual number of killed and wounded Indians must be very much higher than the given Fifty percent additional would be a safe estimate Historian Russell Thornton estimates that from to , the Indian population declined from , to as few as , The depopulation was principally caused by disease as well as warfare.

Many tribes in Texas, such as the Karankawan , Akokisa , Bidui and others, were extinguished due to conflicts with settlers.

Government, and the Doolittle Committee was formed to investigate the causes as well as provide recommendations for preserving the population.

The expansion of migration into the Southeastern United States in the s to the s forced the federal government to deal with the "Indian question".

The Indians were under federal control but were independent of state governments. State legislatures and state judges had no authority on their lands, and the states demanded control.

Politically the new Democratic Party of President Andrew Jackson demanded the removal of the Indians out of the southeastern states to new lands in the west, while the Whig Party and the Protestant churches were opposed to removal.

The Jacksonian Democracy proved irresistible, as it won the presidential elections of , , and By the "Indian Removal policy" began, to implement the act of Congress signed by Andrew Jackson in Many historians have sharply attacked Jackson.

To motivate Natives reluctant to move, the federal government also promised rifles, blankets, tobacco, and cash. By the Cherokee, the last Indian nation in the South, had signed the removal treaty and relocated to Oklahoma.

All the tribes were given new land in the " Indian Territory " which later became Oklahoma. Of the approximate 70, Indians removed, about 18, died from disease, starvation, and exposure on the route.

The impact of the removals was severe. The transplanted tribes had considerable difficulty adapting to their new surroundings and sometimes clashed with the tribes native to the area.

The only way for an Indian to remain and avoid removal was to accept the federal offer of acres 2. However, many Natives who took the offer were defrauded by "ravenous speculators" who stole their claims and sold their land to whites.

Of the five tribes, the Seminole offered the most resistance, hiding out in the Florida swamps and waging a war which cost the U.

Indian warriors in the West, using their traditional style of limited, battle-oriented warfare, confronted the U.

The Indians emphasized bravery in combat while the Army put its emphasis not so much on individual combat as on building networks of forts, developing a logistics system, and using the telegraph and railroads to coordinate and concentrate its forces.

Plains Indian intertribal warfare bore no resemblance to the "modern" warfare practiced by the Americans along European lines, using its vast advantages in population and resources.

Many tribes avoided warfare and others supported the U. The tribes hostile to the government continued to pursue their traditional brand of fighting and, therefore, were unable to have any permanent success against the Army.

Indian wars were fought throughout the western regions, with more conflicts in the states bordering Mexico than in the interior states.

Arizona ranked highest, with known battles fought within the state's boundaries between Americans and the Natives. Arizona ranked highest in war deaths, with 4, killed, including soldiers, civilians, and Native Americans.

That was more than twice as many as occurred in Texas, the second-highest-ranking state. Most of the deaths in Arizona were caused by the Apache.

Michno also says that fifty-one percent of the Indian war battles between and took place in Arizona, Texas, and New Mexico, as well as thirty-seven percent of the casualties in the county west of the Mississippi River.

Indians included in this group attacked and harassed emigrant parties and miners crossing the Snake River Valley, which resulted in further retaliation of the white settlements and the intervention of the United States army.

The war resulted in a total of 1, men who have been killed, wounded, and captured from both sides. Unlike other Indian Wars, the Snake War has widely forgotten in United States history due to having only limited coverage of the war.

The conflict was fought in — while the American Civil War was still ongoing. Caused by dissolution between the Natives and the white settlers in the region, the war was infamous for the atrocities done between the two parties.

White militias destroyed Native villages and killed Indian women and children such as the bloody Sand Creek massacre , and the Indians also raided ranches, farms and killed white families such as the American Ranch massacre and Raid on Godfrey Ranch.

In —, Carson used a scorched earth policy in the Navajo Campaign , burning Navajo fields and homes, and capturing or killing their livestock. He was aided by other Indian tribes with long-standing enmity toward the Navajos, chiefly the Utes.

The Apaches under his command conducted ambushes on US cavalries and forts, such as their attack on Cibecue Creek , while also raiding upon prominent farms and ranches, such as their infamous attack on the Empire Ranch that killed three cowboys.

During the Comanche Campaign , the Red River War was fought in —75 in response to the Comanche's dwindling food supply of buffalo, as well as the refusal of a few bands to be inducted in reservations.

The war finally ended with a final confrontation between the Comanches and the U. Cavalry in Palo Duro Canyon.

The last Comanche war chief, Quanah Parker , surrendered in June , which would finally end the wars fought by Texans and Indians.

It was the most successful campaign against the U. By the Treaty of Fort Laramie , the U. With 53 Modoc warriors, Captain Jack held off 1, men of the U.

Army for 7 months. Captain Jack killed Edward Canby. Numbering only warriors, the Nez Perce "battled some 2, American regulars and volunteers of different military units, together with their Indian auxiliaries of many tribes, in a total of eighteen engagements, including four major battles and at least four fiercely contested skirmishes.

The conflict began after repeated violations of the Treaty of Fort Laramie once gold was discovered in the hills. The end of the major Indian wars came at the Wounded Knee massacre on December 29, , where the 7th Cavalry attempted to disarm a Sioux man and precipitated an engagement in which about Sioux men, women, and children were killed.

Only thirteen days before, Sitting Bull had been killed with his son Crow Foot in a gun battle with a group of Indian police that had been sent by the American government to arrest him.

As the frontier moved westward, the establishment of U. They served as bases for troops at or near strategic areas, particularly for counteracting the Indian presence.

Fort Laramie and Fort Kearny helped protect immigrants crossing the Great Plains and a series of posts in California protected miners.

Forts were constructed to launch attacks against the Sioux. As Indian reservations sprang up, the military set up forts to protect them.

Forts also guarded the Union Pacific and other rail lines. Fort Omaha , Nebraska, was home to the Department of the Platte , and was responsible for outfitting most Western posts for more than 20 years after its founding in the late s.

Fort Huachuca in Arizona was also originally a frontier post and is still in use by the United States Army. Settlers on their way overland to Oregon and California became targets of Indian threats.

Robert L. Munkres read 66 diaries of parties traveling the Oregon Trail between and to estimate the actual dangers they faced from Indian attacks in Nebraska and Wyoming.

The vast majority of diarists reported no armed attacks at all. However many did report harassment by Indians who begged or demanded tolls, and stole horses and cattle.

A second treaty secured safe passage along the Santa Fe Trail for wagon trains. In return, the tribes would receive, for ten years, annual compensation for damages caused by migrants.

In the Far West settlers began to occupy land in Oregon and California before the federal government secured title from the native tribes, causing considerable friction.

In Utah, the Mormons also moved in before federal ownership was obtained. A new policy of establishing reservations came gradually into shape after the boundaries of the "Indian Territory" began to be ignored.

In providing for Indian reservations, Congress and the Office of Indian Affairs hoped to de-tribalize Native Americans and prepare them for integration with the rest of American society, the "ultimate incorporation into the great body of our citizen population".

Influential pioneer towns included Omaha , Nebraska City , and St. American attitudes towards Indians during this period ranged from malevolence "the only good Indian is a dead Indian" to misdirected humanitarianism Indians live in "inferior" societies and by assimilation into white society they can be redeemed to somewhat realistic Native Americans and settlers could co-exist in separate but equal societies, dividing up the remaining western land.

Conflicts erupted in the s, resulting in various Indian wars. Such as in the case of Oliver Loving , they would sometimes attack cowboys and their cattle if ever caught crossing in the borders of their land.

However, the relationship between cowboys and Native Americans were more mutual than they are portrayed, and the former would occasionally pay a fine of 10 cents per cow for the latter to allow them to travel through their land.

After the Civil War, as the volunteer armies disbanded, the regular army cavalry regiments increased in number from six to ten, among them Custer's U.

The black units, along with others both cavalry and infantry , collectively became known as the Buffalo Soldiers. According to Robert M.

Utley :. The frontier army was a conventional military force trying to control, by conventional military methods, a people that did not behave like conventional enemies and, indeed, quite often were not enemies at all.

This is the most difficult of all military assignments, whether in Africa, Asia, or the American West. Westerners were proud of their leadership in the movement for democracy and equality, a major theme for Frederick Jackson Turner.

The new states of Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, and Ohio were more democratic than the parent states back East in terms of politics and society.

By the West, especially California and Oregon, led the Progressive movement. Scholars have examined the social history of the west in search of the American character.

The history of Kansas , argued historian Carl L. Becker a century ago, reflects American ideals. He wrote: "The Kansas spirit is the American spirit double distilled.

It is a new grafted product of American individualism, American idealism, American intolerance. Kansas is America in microcosm.

Scholars have compared the emergence of democracy in America with other countries, regarding the frontier experience. The American frontiersmen relied on individual effort, in the context of very large quantities of unsettled land with weak external enemies.

Israel by contrast, operated in a very small geographical zone, surrounded by more powerful neighbors. The Jewish pioneer was not building an individual or family enterprise, but was a conscious participant in nation-building, with a high priority on collective and cooperative planned settlements.

The Israeli pioneers brought in American experts on irrigation and agriculture to provide technical advice.

However, they rejected the American frontier model in favor of a European model that supported their political and security concerns.

The cities played an essential role in the development of the frontier, as transportation hubs, financial and communications centers, and providers of merchandise, services, and entertainment.

They then shipped the cattle out and cattle drives became short-distance affairs. However, the passenger trains were often the targets of armed gangs.

Denver's economy before had been rooted in mining; it then grew by expanding its role in railroads, wholesale trade, manufacturing, food processing, and servicing the growing agricultural and ranching hinterland.

Denver had always attracted miners, workers, whores, and travelers. Saloons and gambling dens sprung up overnight. The city fathers boasted of its fine theaters, and especially the Tabor Grand Opera House built in Denver gained regional notoriety with its range of bawdy houses, from the sumptuous quarters of renowned madams to the squalid "cribs" located a few blocks away.

Business was good; visitors spent lavishly, then left town. As long as madams conducted their business discreetly, and "crib girls" did not advertise their availability too crudely, authorities took their bribes and looked the other way.

Occasional cleanups and crack downs satisfied the demands for reform. With its giant mountain of copper, Butte, Montana , was the largest, richest, and rowdiest mining camp on the frontier.

It was an ethnic stronghold, with the Irish Catholics in control of politics and of the best jobs at the leading mining corporation Anaconda Copper.

Ring argues that the library was originally a mechanism of social control, "an antidote to the miners' proclivity for drinking, whoring, and gambling".

It was also designed to promote middle-class values and to convince Easterners that Butte was a cultivated city. European immigrants often built communities of similar religious and ethnic backgrounds.

African Americans moved West as soldiers, as well as cowboys, farmhands, saloon workers, cooks, and outlaws. The Buffalo Soldiers were soldiers in the all-black 9th and 10th Cavalry regiments, and 24th and 25th Infantry Regiments of the U.

They had white officers and served in numerous western forts. About 4, blacks came to California in Gold Rush days. In , after the end of Reconstruction in the South, several thousand Freedmen moved from Southern states to Kansas.

Known as the Exodusters , they were lured by the prospect of good, cheap Homestead Law land and better treatment. The all-black town of Nicodemus, Kansas , which was founded in , was an organized settlement that predates the Exodusters but is often associated with them.

Chinese migrants, many of whom were impoverished peasants, provided the major part of the workforce for the building of the Central Pacific portion of the transcontinental railroad.

Most of them went home by when the railroad was finished. The Chinese were generally forced into self-sufficient "Chinatowns" in cities such as San Francisco , Portland , and Seattle.

By the s, however, Chinatowns had become clean, safe and attractive tourist destinations. The first Japanese arrived in the U. Japanese were recruited to work on plantations in Hawaii, beginning in By the late 19th Century, more Japanese emigrated to Hawaii and the American mainland.

The Issei, or first-generation Japanese immigrants, were not allowed to become U. This did not change until the passage of the Immigration and Nationality Act of , known as the McCarran-Walter Act, which allowed Japanese immigrants to become naturalized U.

There were , Japanese Americans in the U. The great majority of Hispanics who had been living in the former territories of New Spain remained and became American citizens in

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